1950_Korean War Begins

On June 25, 1950 the Korean war(also know as the first Hot War) began after North Korea invaded South Korea by crossing the 38th parallel that separated the two regions. The conflict started between the two governments competing for control, but soon escalated into a multi-national conflict. Kim II Sung lead North Korea, determined to unite both sides together under a communist rule. The Korean war set the standards for later conflicts, by being the first armed confrontation of the cold war.GO HERE, you will find a video of real footage during the Korean War


The picture shows the berlin wall being constructed, separating the soviet sector from West Berlin
The picture shows the berlin wall being constructed, separating the soviet sector from West Berlin




Construction of Berlin Wall Begins

2.7 million people had left Berlin during the time of 1948 and 1961 which caused social and economic difficulties for the East german party.Something had to be done in order to control the movement and keep their leadership in tacked. The construction of the Berlin Wall started August 13, 1961 when barriers where set up to pin point the borders, separating the Soviet sector from West Berlin. The tactful move made by the German Democratic Republic stopped East Berliners from leaving the state side into the West city.

Salt II Treaty Signed

The SALT (Strategic Arms Limitations Treaty) II Treaty was an agreement between the United States and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. Negotiations began in November of 1972, with the intent of replacing the Interim Agreement with a long term comprehensive treaty providing broad limits on strategic offensive weapons systems.

Early discussions included weapon systems to be used, factors involved in providing equality in numbers of strategic nuclear delivery vehicles, bans on new systems, qualitative limits, and a notion to include forward-based systems. The positions of the USSR and USA vastly differed from one another on many of the issues.

In November of 1974, a major breakthrough was reached at the Vladivostok meeting between President Ford and General Secretary Brezhnev. During the conference, a basic structure for the SALT II agreement was reached. Fundamental elements included:
  • 2,400 equal aggregate limit on ICBMs, SLMBs, and heavy bombers on both sides;
  • 1320 equal aggregate limit on MIRV systems;
  • Ban on construction of new land-based ICBM launchers;
  • Limits on deployment of new types of strategic arms;
  • Important elements of the Interim Agreement were also included.
The new agreement wasn't to expire until 1985

More limitations were later added to the agreement. They were:
  • A protocol of three years duration which would cover cruise missile constraints, mobile ICBM limits, and qualitative constraints on ICBms, and other similar issues;
  • A Joint Statement of Principles which would be an agreed set of guidelines for future negotiations.
President Carter and General Secretary Breznev signing the Treaty
President Carter and General Secretary Breznev signing the Treaty



The SALT II agreement was signed by President Carter and General Secretary Brezhnev in Vienna on June 18, 1979.

Germany Reunited

Germany before unity. West Germany is depicted as blue. East Germany is red.
Germany before unity. West Germany is depicted as blue. East Germany is red.

The German reunification occurred in 1990, and was the process in which the German Democratic Republic (known as GDR, or East Germany) aligned itself with the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG, or West Germany). This event is officially celebrated on October third, and is called "German Unity Day".

GDR and FRG negotiated terms and created the "Unification Treaty," which also
A cartoon illustrating the reunification
A cartoon illustrating the reunification

helped to create the "Two Plus Four Treaty" (this was between GDR, FRG, and the four occupying powers).

The unification of Germany may have been pleasant for them, but not everyone was pleased with it. "France and Great Britain should pull together today in the face of the German threat," said Baroness Margaret Thatcher in London in March of 1990, according to a French Telegram. Click here to learn more about Thatcher's opinion on the reunification of Germany.