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Tuesday, April 12

  1. page 1962_Cuban Missile edited 1962: The Cuban Missile Crisis was the closest the world ever came to nuclear war. The United…
    1962:
    The
    Cuban Missile Crisis was the closest the world ever came to nuclear war. The United States and the Soviet Union were well prepared to use battlefield nuclear weapons. Do to President John F. Kennedy and Premier Nikita Khrushchev, war was not a threat.
 In 1962, the Soviet Union was desperately behind the United States in armed missiles. The Soviet's missiles were only powerful enough to be launched against Europe but U.S. missiles were capable of striking the entire Soviet Union. In late April 1962, Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev had a idea of placing intermediate-range missiles in Cuba. This would give the Soviets a fair fight against the U.S. In the summer of 192 worked in secret to build its missile installations in Cuba.
    {http://library.thinkquest.org/11046/days/cuba_missile_map.jpg} Missile Map
    A spy plan revealed Soviet missiles under construction in Cuba. Early the next day, President John Kennedy was informed of the missile installations. Kennedy immediately organized the EX-COMM, a group of his twelve most important advisors to handle the crisis. After seven days of guarded and intense debate, Kennedy concluded to impose a naval quarantine around Cuba. He wished to prevent the arrival of more Soviet offensive weapons on the island. On October 22, Kennedy announced the discovery of the missile installations to the public and his decision to quarantine the island. He also proclaimed that any nuclear missile launched from Cuba would be regarded as an attack on the United States by the Soviet Union and demanded that the Soviets remove all of their offensive weapons from Cuba.
Tensions finally began to ease on October 28 when Khrushchev announced that he would dismantle the installations and return the missiles to the Soviet Union, expressing his trust that the United States would not invade Cuba. 

    President Kennedy addresses the nation of the missile crisis that is occurring in Cuba.

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    7:15 am
  2. page 1953_ Rosenberg executions edited ... {http://thewashingtonroast.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/Rosenberg_EJ.jpg} http://thewashingt…
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    {http://thewashingtonroast.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/Rosenberg_EJ.jpg} http://thewashingtonroast.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/Rosenberg_EJ.jpg
    The Rosenberg's Appeal for Stay of Execution is Unsuccessful---Julius Rosenberg and Ethel Rosenberg were American communists who were executed in 1953 for conspiracy to commit espionage. The charges related to passing information about the atomic bomb to the Soviet Union. This was the first execution of civilians for espionage in United States history.
    Citations: Rosenberg, Ethel. "The Rosenberg Trial." Cold War Museum. Cold War Museum, 17 May 2008. Web. 31 Mar. 2011. <http://www.coldwar.org/articles/50s/TheRosenbergTrial.asp>.
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    6:27 am
  3. page 1953_ Rosenberg executions edited ... The government was investigating Soviet spys in the United States. Eventually, arrests were ma…
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    The government was investigating Soviet spys in the United States. Eventually, arrests were made. The arrests of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg became known worldwide. Both Julius Rosenberg and Ethel were active in labor rights and radical politics. Julius joined the Communist Party, he obtained a position in the U.S. Army Signal Corps. as a civilian engineer. Julius Rosenberg was arrested on July 17, 1950. On August 11, Ethel Rosenberg was arrested. They were arrested on charges of involvement in a spy-ring which sold atomic weapons secrets to the Soviet Union. The Rosenbergs were accused of persuading Ethel's brother, David Greenglass, to provide them with confidential U.S. military information gained from his involvement in the development of nuclear weapons. It was believed that Julius, then funneled the top-secret information on to Soviet intelligence. The prosecution lasted for only fifteen trial days and one day of jury deliberation. The Rosenbergs were convicted on March 30, 1951. On April 5, Julius and Ethel Rosenberg were sentenced to death. On June 19, 1953, one day after their wedding anniversary, the Rosenbergs were executed by electric chair at Sing Sing Prison.
    {http://thewashingtonroast.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/Rosenberg_EJ.jpg} http://thewashingtonroast.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/Rosenberg_EJ.jpg
    The Rosenberg's Appeal for Stay of Execution is Unsuccessful---Julius Rosenberg and Ethel Rosenberg were American communists who were executed in 1953 for conspiracy to commit espionage. The charges related to passing information about the atomic bomb to the Soviet Union. This was the first execution of civilians for espionage in United States history.
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    6:23 am
  4. page 1953_ Rosenberg executions edited ... Rosenberg became known worldwide. Both ... Soviet Union. The Rosenbergs were accused of…

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    Rosenberg became known worldwide. Both
    ...
    Soviet Union. The Rosenbergs were accused of persuading Ethel's brother, David Greenglass, to provide them with confidential U.S. military information gained from his involvement in the development of nuclear weapons. It was believed that Julius, then funneled the top-secret information on to Soviet intelligence. The prosecution
    {http://thewashingtonroast.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/Rosenberg_EJ.jpg} http://thewashingtonroast.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/Rosenberg_EJ.jpg
    (view changes)
    6:18 am

Monday, April 11

  1. page 1980_Spying in West Berlin edited West Berlin, situated 100 miles inside the Iron Curtain, was an island of democracy that the Allied…
    West Berlin, situated 100 miles inside the Iron Curtain, was an island of democracy that the Allied forces found invaluable when it came to keeping an eye on the Soviet Union and it’s communist allies. All manner of electronic surveilence and human intelligence was operated from West Berlin. In short, it was a hotbed of spies.
    Berlin was divided between the four victorious powers at the end of the Second World War, as a means to distribute power in Germany at the very beginning of the Cold War. The British, Americans and French controlled sectors in West Berlin, and the Soviets controlled the whole of the East (they claimed a larger sector in accordance with the sacrifices the Soviets made in capturing Eastern Germany). Almost immediately after the end of the war, suspicions and secrets began taking hold in the city, and each of the powers brought in their intelligence services to spy on the enemy.
    {1514616421_904ea0a6ba_z.jpg} Image by Imparo on Flickr, used under a CC 2.0 Generic License
    The Americans and British were quickBerlin was divided between the four victorious powers at the end of the Second World War, as a means to establish electronic surveilance sites throughdistribute power in Germany at the city,very beginning of the Cold War. The British, Americans and French controlled sectors in West Berlin, and the 1950’s established what turned out to be a coup inSoviets controlled the spy world. On topwhole of the East (they claimed a hill created fromlarger sector in accordance with the rubble of ruined buildings fromsacrifices the war, known as Teufelsberg (Devil’s Mountain),Soviets made in capturing Eastern Germany). Almost immediately after the Allies built Field Station Berlin, a massend of radio listening devices from which they could monitor Sovietthe war, suspicions and East German military radio. The Allies could now track all troop movements and other sensitive information aroundsecrets began taking hold in the important nodecity, and each of Berlin.the powers brought in their intelligence services to spy on the enemy.
    {155856066_537db55d9a_b.jpg} Field Station Berlin, Teufelsberg, Berlin. Image by extranoise on Flickr, used under a CC 2.0 Generic License
    The Americans and British were quick to establish electronic surveilance sites through the city, and in the 1950’s established what turned out to be a coup in the spy world. On top of a hill created from the rubble of ruined buildings from the war, known as Teufelsberg (Devil’s Mountain), the Allies built Field Station Berlin, a mass of radio listening devices from which they could monitor Soviet and East German military radio. The Allies could now track all troop movements and other sensitive information around the important node of Berlin.
    Other spying ventures were more daring and spectacular. Tunnels were dug underneath the Berlin Wall into the Soviet sector in order to tap phone lines that lead to important military and government centers. Many important people on both sides of the wall were approached to give away secrets, often using blackmail and other pressures. The Allies and the Soviets flew helicopter missions around the wall to photograph each other’s activities. These flights, if they strayed over the borders, were considered an act of aggression, and were then fired upon by soldiers on the ground.
    This Cold War Great Game had it’s most spectacular expression in the Military Liasion Missions that were allowed to operate in enemy territory. As an agreement at the end of the Second World War, and it seems a rare gesture of goodwill on the part of the Allies and the Soviets, each side could send a team into the other’s sectors to observe military sites. These teams drove cars that were fitted with powerful engines, the chassis strengthened for off-road dashes, and fuel tanks that could carry the teams over 500 miles through enemy territory. The U.S. Military Liasion Mission (USMLM) and the British Mission to Soviet Forces in Germany (BRIXMIS) both were headquartered in West Berlin, where they began and ended missions.
    {3740242019_fe3abffe75_b.jpg} BRIXMIS vehicle. Image by Jilmw on Flickr used under a CC 2.0 Generic License
    Although they were meant to operate as observation-only teams, the teams brought back incredibly detailed photographs of enemy military hardware and movements, and on many occasions stole sensitive documents and equipment from their enemy. The teams were given free pass on public roads, however if the Mission cars were discovered in restricted areas (where they often went), enemy soldiers could open fire on them. A few members of the teams were killed in the line of duty, the last being American Major Arthur Nicholson in 1985. These incidents were kept very secret, the fear of public outcry leading to pressure on both sides to retaliate.
    It is often portrayed as a deadly game of cat and mouse in the media, the spy missions that operated from West Berlin during the Cold War. But with historical hindsight, the surveillance and intelligence operations did more to keep the Cold War escalating to something more deadly. Each side understood the importance of keeping an eye on the other, and the policy of mutual containment held each side’s military at bay.
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    6:48 pm
  2. page 1980_Spying in West Berlin edited ... {1514616421_904ea0a6ba_z.jpg} Image by Imparo on Flickr, used under a CC 2.0 Generic License …
    ...
    {1514616421_904ea0a6ba_z.jpg} Image by Imparo on Flickr, used under a CC 2.0 Generic License
    The Americans and British were quick to establish electronic surveilance sites through the city, and in the 1950’s established what turned out to be a coup in the spy world. On top of a hill created from the rubble of ruined buildings from the war, known as Teufelsberg (Devil’s Mountain), the Allies built Field Station Berlin, a mass of radio listening devices from which they could monitor Soviet and East German military radio. The Allies could now track all troop movements and other sensitive information around the important node of Berlin.
    {155856066_537db55d9a_b.jpg} Field Station Berlin, Teufelsberg, Berlin. Image by extranoise on Flickr, used under a CC 2.0 Generic License
    Other spying ventures were more daring and spectacular. Tunnels were dug underneath the Berlin Wall into the Soviet sector in order to tap phone lines that lead to important military and government centers. Many important people on both sides of the wall were approached to give away secrets, often using blackmail and other pressures. The Allies and the Soviets flew helicopter missions around the wall to photograph each other’s activities. These flights, if they strayed over the borders, were considered an act of aggression, and were then fired upon by soldiers on the ground.
    This Cold War Great Game had it’s most spectacular expression in the Military Liasion Missions that were allowed to operate in enemy territory. As an agreement at the end of the Second World War, and it seems a rare gesture of goodwill on the part of the Allies and the Soviets, each side could send a team into the other’s sectors to observe military sites. These teams drove cars that were fitted with powerful engines, the chassis strengthened for off-road dashes, and fuel tanks that could carry the teams over 500 miles through enemy territory. The U.S. Military Liasion Mission (USMLM) and the British Mission to Soviet Forces in Germany (BRIXMIS) both were headquartered in West Berlin, where they began and ended missions.
    (view changes)
    6:41 pm

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