President Nixon extends Vietnam War to Cambodia


external image RichardNixon.jpg
President Nixon announces the invasion of Cambodia
President Nixon announces the invasion of Cambodia
The main goal in the Vietnam War was to “achieve peace with honor.” The American people were not happy being involved a war which they didn’t believe they should be in. President Richard M. Nixon tried to reduce the number of U.S. soldiers in Southern Vietnam by a policy called “Vietnamization.” Vietnamization was the process of transferring the fighting to the Southern Vietnamese troops instead of having U.S. troops protect them. Nixon was hoping that they would learn what they needed to do for protection of their own people and America could gracefully leave Vietnam. This was not the case however as the South Vietnamese soldiers still relied on American air support and supplies.
Intending to end the war and conquer North Vietnam, President Nixon reinstated the bombing of the area which President Johnson had suspended in October 1968. The North Vietnamese sanctuaries were used for hit and run attacks on South Vietnamese and American troops but caused an uproar of protests when the sanctuaries were attacked. The most tragic of these protests occurred on May 4, 1970, at Kent State University, resulting in the death of four civilians and the wounding of nine.
American Soldiers accidently killed American kids on their way to class during the protesting at Kent State University.
American Soldiers accidently killed American kids on their way to class during the protesting at Kent State University.
Following these events, peace talks came underway between National Security Adviser Henry Kissinger and North Vietnamese Foreign Minister Le Duc Tho. In October 1972, the two came to an agreement. However, South Vietnam opposed the treaty. The difference in opinions quickly led to the disintegration of the agreement. Following the fall through agreement, eleven days were spent bombing North Vietnamese cities near Christmas. As a result of the bombings, more negotiations followed finally producing a new agreement in January 1973. The new agreement, signed in Paris, called for immediate peace, withdrawal of the American military, release of prisoners of war, and an international force to maintain the peace. Both Henry Kissinger and Minister Le Duc Tho were awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace in 1973, but Tho declined the distinction.
The following video is President Nixon's entire Cambodia Incursion Address.





Biblography

Carr, Nicholas. "Richard M. Nixon." Britannica.com. Britannica Academic Edition. Web. 07 Apr. 2011.
<http://www.britannica.com.prxy2.ursus.maine.edu/EBchecked/topic/416465/Richard-M-Nixon>.
Eidenmuller, Michael E. "American Rhetoric: Richard M. Nixon -- Cambodian Incursion Address." American Rhetoric: The Power of Oratory in the United States. American Rhetoric, 2001. Web. 30 Mar. 2011.
<http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/richardnixoncambodia.html>.
Vanhemelryck, Marc. "Cambodia and the Vietnam War." Taxivantha.com. Taxi Vantha. Web. 07 Apr. 2011.
<http://www.taxivantha.com/1_Cambodia/116.htm>.

Video-http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3cAAnoqmksg

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